Form of Government


Wikipedia lists over 80 forms and sub-forms of government – realistically only a handful are sustainable for short periods, but will ultimately fail in the long term.


The two forms of government in the CENTER both have substantial drawbacks:

1) Republic Form of Government – or, the current U.S. form of government

– This form of government can work for small, homogeneous countries (as the U.S was in 1776), but it will always ultimately self-destruct as it grows.

2) Democracy or Direct Democracytried in Ancient Greek and Roman times

5000 years of history has proven this form unsustainable many times, as ultimately everyone ‘goes on the dole’ and no one wants to work any more, self-destructing

The reason for these two thoughts are very simple –

two human characteristics in all of us:  Greed and Laziness


OSPF believes that the answers lies somewhere in the MIDDLE GROUND

Take a look at the changes the U.S. has undergone in just under 250 years:

1776

2010

change

Population

2.5 million

309.6 million

12,284%

Number of States

13

50

285%

Revenue collected

$20 million*

$2.2 trillion**

10,999,900%

Number of Senators and Representatives

55***

535

873%

Ratio of Representative to Citizens

1 : 45,455

1 : 577,570

1,171%

* collected between 1781 – 1784, adjusted for inflation from the year 1800 (Wikipedia, History of the United States (1776 – 1789)) Inflation adjustment calculator: West Egg

** as of August 12, 2010, U.S. Debt Clock.org

*** number of delegates at the First Continental Congress in Philadelphia , September 5, 1774,U.S. History.com

********************************************************************

What does this tell us?  Where do we go from here?

As we can see, in 1776 the U.S. was a relatively small, homogeneous country, so a Republican form of government worked well back then.  It has clearly evolved into a monster melting pot of the world.  While this is much more difficult to manage, ultimately, the middle point of these vastly different viewpoints of so many citizens can provide the basis for the strongest foundation in the world that almost no other country can match (i.e. not a country of ‘yes men’).

While both Representative and Direct Democracy have drawbacks, they both also have two significant strong points on which to build upon –

1) Rule of Law, and, 2) Wide Representation

Building upon this, Open Source Political Framework then is simply an extension, or, a further development of these to forms of government – the perfect middle ground.

OSPF Proposes:

1) increase representation (i.e. add ‘voters‘, or Goal #3 of the Four Main Goals) and eliminate all represented officials (goal #2 of the Four Main Goals)

2)  without going to Direct Democracy fully (i.e. eliminate general ballot voting by the entire population, paper or electronic, or, Goal #4 of the Four Main Goals),

3) but rather than just match what was created in 1776, improve on it, and easily, through cheap and readily available technology (Goal #1 of the Four Main Goals) to get to a representation rate of 1:1000 (Goal #3 of the Four Main Goals)

This would result in a TRUE ‘Representative form of Democracy’ that even the Founding Fathers didn’t have in mind (maybe because they were all quite wealthy themselves and had vested interests??) but in a more realistic relationship to past and future population growth and 100% transparency for reduced pitfalls of it self-destructing.

* collected between 1781 – 1784, adjusted for inflation from the year 1800, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_United_States_%281776%E2%80%931789%29#American_Revolution

Inflation adjustment calculator: http://www.westegg.com/inflation/infl.cgi

** as of August 12, 2010, http://www.usdebtclock.org/

*** number of delegates at the First Continental Congress in Philadelphia , September 5, 1774, http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h650.html

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